Dutch ...ish


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Dutch ...ish

Dutch...ish

Ahoy
from hoi (="hello")

Booze
from Middle Dutch busen (="to drink
in excess").


Boss
from baas


Cookie
from koekje, or in informal Dutch
koekie (="biscuit", "cookie")
Cruise
from (door)kruisen (="to cross")

Gas
from gas, a Dutch neologism derived
from the Greek word for Chaos


Geek
from geck (gek) (="fool")

Golf
from kolf (="bat, club", but also a
game played with these)


Skipper
from Middle Dutch scipper (now schipper
=literally "shipper")


Tattoo (military term)
from taptoe (=literally "close the tap").
So called because police used to visit taverns
in the evening to shut off the taps
of casks.


Whore
from huren (="to rent, to hire")

Yankee
from Jan Kees, a Dutch personal name,
originally used mockingly to describe pro-
French revolutionary citizens in America.

 
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Dam
from Middle Dutch dam (compare Amsterdam
or Rotterdam)


Dope
old meaning: sauce, now drugs, comes
from the Dutch verb (in)dopen (usually
="to baptize", but here ="to dip in")


Decoy
from de kooi (="the cage")

Gin
from jeneverIceberg
probably from Dutch ijsberg (literally ice
mountain).


Landscape
from landschap

Mannequin
via French from Dutch manneken (=literally
"little man")


Mart
from Middle Dutch marct (=literally
"market") (modern Dutch: markt)


Santa Claus
from Middle Dutch Sinterklaas
(="Saint Nicholas"), bishop of Asia
Minor who became a patron saint for
children. (Dutch and Flemish feast celebrated
on the 5th and 6th of December
respectively) (Origins of Santa Claus in
US culture)


Skate, to skate
from schaats. The noun was originally
adopted as in Dutch, with 'skates' being
the singular form of the noun; due to the
similarity to regular English plurals this
form was ultimately used as the plural
while 'skate' was derived for use as singular."


Sketch
from schets
Sled, sleigh
from Middle Dutch slede, slee


Slim
"thin, slight, slender," from Dutch slim
"bad, sly, clever," from M.Du. slim
"bad, crooked,"


Snack
perhaps from Middle Dutch snakken
(="to long" (snakken naar lucht="to
gasp for air") originally "to eat"/"chatter")


Snoop
from snoepen (to eat (possibly in secret)
something sweet)


Spooky
from spook (="ghost(ly image)")

Stoker
from stoken (="stoke a fire")

Yankee
from Jan-Kees, a Dutch personal name,
originally used mockingly to describe the
pro-French revolutionary citizens of
New Amsterdam.


Bowery
(neighborhood in southern Manhattan)
Bouwerij was the old Dutch word for
farm (today boerderij)

 


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